Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

v3.10.0.1
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Use of Estimates, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Use of Estimates in the Financial Statements
 
The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. These estimates and assumptions include valuing equity securities and derivative financial instruments issued in financing transactions, allowance for doubtful accounts, inventory reserves, deferred taxes and related valuation allowances, and the fair values of long lived assets, intangibles, goodwill and contingent consideration. Actual results could differ from the estimates.
Cash and Cash Equivalents, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Cash and Cash Equivalents
 
The Company considers all highly liquid investments with maturities of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents. The Company’s balance of cash and cash equivalents at December 31, 2018 and 2017 consisted principally of bank deposits. From time to time, the Company’s cash account balances may be uninsured or in deposit accounts that exceed Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation guarantee limit. The Company reduces its exposure to credit risk by maintaining its cash deposits with major financial institutions and monitoring their credit ratings.
Receivables, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Trade Accounts Receivable
 
Trade accounts receivable are stated at the amount the Company expects to collect and do not bear interest. The Company evaluates the collectability of accounts receivable based on a combination of factors. In circumstances where a specific customer is unable to meet its financial obligations to the Company, a provision to the allowances for doubtful accounts is recorded against amounts due to reduce the net recognized receivable to the amount that is reasonably expected to be collected. For all other customers, a provision to the allowances for doubtful accounts is recorded based on factors including the length of time the receivables are past due, the current business environment and the Company’s historical experience. Provisions to the allowances for doubtful accounts are recorded to selling, general and administrative expenses. Account balances are charged off against the allowance when it is probable that the receivable will not be recovered. The allowance for doubtful accounts was nominal for December 31, 2018 and 2017.
Inventory, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Inventory
 
Inventory is stated at the lower of cost, the value determined by the first-in, first-out method, or net realizable value. At each balance sheet date, the Company evaluates inventories for excess quantities, obsolescence or shelf life expiration. This evaluation includes analysis of historical sales levels by product, projections of future demand, the risk of technological or competitive obsolescence for products, general market conditions, and a review of the shelf life expiration dates for products. To the extent that management determines there are excess or obsolete inventory or quantities with a shelf life that is too near its expiration for the Company to reasonably expect that it can sell those products prior to their expiration, the Company adjusts the carrying value to estimated net realizable value.
Property, Plant and Equipment, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Improvements and Equipment
 
Improvements and equipment are recorded at cost. Depreciation of equipment is computed utilizing the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets. Amortization of leasehold improvements is computed utilizing the straight-line method over the lesser of the lease term or the estimated useful life. Repairs and maintenance costs are expensed as incurred. The cost of major additions and improvements is capitalized, while maintenance and repair costs that do not improve or extend the lives of the respective assets are charged to operations as incurred.
Goodwill and Intangible Assets, Intangible Assets, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Goodwill and Other Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets
 
The Company records goodwill and other indefinite-lived assets in connection with business combinations. Goodwill, which represents the excess of acquisition cost over the fair value of the net tangible and intangible assets of acquired companies, is not amortized. Indefinite-lived assets are stated at fair value as of the date acquired in a business combination.
 
The Company assesses the recoverability of goodwill and certain indefinite-lived intangible assets annually in the fourth quarter and between annual tests if an event occurs or circumstances change that would indicate the carrying amount may be impaired. Impairment testing for goodwill is done at a reporting unit level. Under Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) guidance for goodwill and intangible assets, a reporting unit is defined as an operating segment or one level below the operating segment, called a component. However, two or more components of an operating segment will be aggregated and deemed a single reporting unit if the components have similar economic characteristics. The Company operates as one reporting unit.
 
Authoritative accounting guidance allows the Company to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is necessary to perform the more detailed two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test. The Company performs the quantitative test if its qualitative assessment determined it is more likely than not that a reporting unit’s fair value is less than its carrying amount. The Company may elect to bypass the qualitative assessment and proceed directly to the quantitative test for any reporting unit or asset. The quantitative goodwill impairment test, if necessary, is a two-step process. The first step is to identify the existence of a potential impairment by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit (the estimated fair value of a reporting unit is usually calculated using a discounted cash flow model) with its carrying amount, including goodwill. If the fair value of a reporting unit exceeds its carrying amount, the reporting unit’s goodwill is considered not to be impaired and performance of the second step of the quantitative goodwill impairment test is unnecessary. However, if the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the second step of the quantitative goodwill impairment test is performed to measure the amount of impairment loss to be recorded, if any. The second step of the quantitative goodwill impairment test compares the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill. If the carrying amount of the reporting unit’s goodwill exceeds its implied fair value, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess. The implied fair value of goodwill is determined using the same approach as employed when determining the amount of goodwill that would be recognized in a business combination. That is, the fair value of the reporting unit is allocated to all of its assets and liabilities as if the reporting unit had been acquired in a business combination and the fair value was the purchase price paid to acquire the reporting unit.
 
The Company proceeded directly to the quantitative analysis considering the consideration to be received and the assets to be sold under the APA. As a result of this test, the Company’s goodwill was determined to be impaired and an impairment charge of $10.3 million was recorded for the year ended December 31, 2017.
 
As of May 7, 2018, as a result of completing the Celularity AST, the Goodwill and Intangible Assets have been disposed of. At December 31, 2017 the remaining recorded goodwill was $1,659,000, included in assets of discontinued operations – noncurrent on the consolidated balance sheet. The changes in the carrying amount of goodwill for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, are as follows (in thousands):
 
 
 
Goodwill
 
 
 
 
 
Balance as of 
January 1, 2017
 
$
11,959
 
 
 
 
 
 
Impairment loss
 
 
(10,300
)
 
 
 
 
 
Balance as of December 31, 2017
 
 
1,659
 
 
 
 
 
 
Disposal of Intangible Assets, Asset Sale
 
 
(1,659
)
 
 
 
 
 
Balance as of December 31, 2018
 
$
0
 
Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets, Including Intangible Assets, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Long-Lived Assets
 
Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment, and intangibles subject to amortization, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. The Company’s long-lived intangible assets primarily consist of developed technology, customer lists/relationships, non-compete agreements, trade names and trademarks and are amortized ratably over a range of one to ten years which approximates customer attrition rate and technology obsolescence. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its estimated future cash flows, an impairment charge is recognized of the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset.
 
The Company continually evaluates whether events or changes in circumstances might indicate that the remaining estimated useful life of long-lived assets may warrant revision, or that the remaining balance may not be recoverable. When factors indicate that long-lived assets should be evaluated for possible impairment, the Company uses an estimate of the related undiscounted cash flows in measuring whether the long-lived asset should be written down to fair value. Measurement of the amount of impairment is based on generally accepted valuation methodologies, as deemed appropriate. The factors used to determine fair value are subject to management’s judgement and expertise and include, but are not limited to, the present value of future cash flows, net of estimated operating costs, anticipated capital expenditures and various discount rates commensurate with the risk and current market conditions associated with realizing the expected cash flows projected.
 
Due to the APA, the long-lived asset group related to the Purchased Assets were sold and otherwise disposed of significantly before the end of its previously estimated useful life. The Company, therefore, tested its long-lived assets for recoverability as of December 31, 2017. These long-lived assets consist of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets subject to amortization.
 
The consideration under the APA for the sale of the long-lived assets approximate the net book value of these assets at December 31, 2017, therefore, no impairment charge was recorded for long-lived assets during the year ended December 31, 2017.
 
There were no long-lived assets as of December 31, 2018, due to the Celularity AST.
Fair Value of Financial Instruments, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Fair Value of Financial Instruments
 
The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets for cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable and accounts payable and accrued expenses approximate fair value based on the short-term maturity of these instruments.
 
Fair value is defined as the price that would be received upon selling an asset or the price paid to transfer a liability on the measurement date. It focuses on the exit price in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between willing market participants. A three-tier fair value hierarchy is established as a basis for considering such assumptions and for inputs used in the valuation methodologies in measuring fair value. This hierarchy requires entities to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. The three levels of inputs used to measure fair values are as follows:
 
Level 1:
Observable prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities.
 
Level 2:
Observable inputs other than quoted prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities.
 
Level 3:
Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets and liabilities.
Selling, General and Administrative Expenses, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Cost of Goods Sold and Selling, General and Administrative Expenses
 
Costs associated with the production and procurement of product are included in cost of goods sold, including shipping and handling costs such as inbound freight costs, purchasing and receiving costs, inspection costs and other product procurement related charges. All other expenses are included in selling, general and administrative expenses, as the predominant expenses associated therewith are general and administrative in nature.
Shipping and Handling Costs [Policy Text Block]
Shipping and Handling
 
Amounts billed to customers for shipping and handling are included in revenues. The related shipping and freight charges incurred by the Company are included in cost of goods sold and were not material for either the years ended December 31, 2018 or 2017.
Research and Development Expense, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Business Development
 
The Company accounts for costs due to professional fees, including accounting, legal and consulting fees related to business developments; in the past these were in other expenses and professional fees as part of general and administrative expenses, however because they are not of a normal course of business, these have been reclassified and presented separately within the Company’s statement of operations. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we incurred business development costs of $1.0 million and during the year ended December 31, 2017, we received a benefit of $0.366 million in development due, in part, to the repayment of a portion of the bridge loan to Soluble Systems, LLC that had been previously written off at the time the proposed transaction was terminated.
Income Tax, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Income Taxes
 
The Company accounts for income taxes pursuant to the asset and liability method which requires us to recognize current tax liabilities or receivables for the amount of taxes the Company estimate are payable or refundable for the current year and deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences attributable to temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts and their respective tax bases of assets and liabilities and the expected benefits of net operating loss and credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in operations in the period enacted. A valuation allowance is provided when it is more likely than not that a portion or all of a deferred tax asset will not be realized. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income and the reversal of deferred tax liabilities during the period in which related temporary differences become deductible.
 
The Company adopted the provisions of Accounting Standards Codification Topic 740 (“ASC 740”) related to the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise's consolidated financial statements. ASC 740 prescribes a comprehensive model for the financial statement recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken in income tax returns.
 
The benefit of tax positions taken or expected to be taken in the Company's income tax returns are recognized in the financial statements if such positions are more likely than not of being sustained upon examination by taxing authorities. Differences between tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return and the benefit recognized and measured pursuant to the interpretation are referred to as “unrecognized benefits”. A liability is recognized (or amount of net operating loss carryover or amount of tax refundable is reduced) for an unrecognized tax benefit because it represents an enterprise’s potential future obligation to the taxing authority for a tax position that was not recognized as a result of applying the provisions of ASC 740. Interest costs and related penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits are required to be calculated, if applicable. The Company’s policy is to classify assessments, if any, for tax related interest as interest expense and penalties as selling, general and administrative expenses. No interest or penalties were recorded during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017. As of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, no liability for unrecognized tax benefits was required to be reported. The Company does not expect any significant changes in its unrecognized tax benefits in the next year.
Common Stock Purchase Warrant [Policy Text Block]
Common Stock Purchase Warrants
 
The Company assesses classification of common stock purchase warrants at each reporting date to determine whether a change in classification between assets and liabilities or equity is required.  The Company’s free-standing derivatives consist of warrants to purchase common stock that were issued pursuant to a Securities Purchase Agreement on November 8, 2012 (which expired in November 2017) and pursuant to a Credit Agreement on May 29, 2015.  The Company evaluated the common stock purchase warrants to assess their proper classification in the consolidated balance sheet and determined that the common stock purchase warrants contain exercise reset provisions.  Accordingly, the outstanding portions of these instruments have been classified as warrant liabilities in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets as of December 31, 2018 and 2017.  The Company re-measures warrant liabilities at each reporting and exercise date, with changes in fair value recognized in earnings for each reporting period.
Share-based Compensation, Option and Incentive Plans Policy [Policy Text Block]
Stock-Based Compensation
 
The Company measures the cost of services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the fair value of the award. For employees and directors, the fair value of the award is measured on the grant date and for non-employees, the fair value of the award is generally re-measured on interim financial reporting dates and vesting dates until the service period is complete. The fair value amount is then recognized over the period services are required to be provided in exchange for the award, usually the vesting period. The Company recognizes stock-based compensation expense on a graded-vesting basis over the requisite service period for each separately vesting tranche of each award. Stock-based compensation expense is reflected within cost of revenues and operating expenses in the consolidated statements of operations. The Company recognizes stock-based compensation expense for awards with performance conditions if and when the Company concludes that it is probable that the performance condition will be achieved. The Company reassesses the probability of vesting at each reporting period for awards with performance conditions and adjusts stock-based compensation expense based on its probability assessment.
New Accounting Pronouncements, Policy [Policy Text Block]
Recent Accounting Standards
 
In February 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-02, "Leases (Topic 842)." ASU 2016-02 requires that a lessee recognize the assets and liabilities that arise from operating leases. A lessee should recognize in the statement of financial position a liability to make lease payments (the lease liability) and a right-of-use asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term. For leases with a term of 12 months or less, a lessee is permitted to make an accounting policy election by class of underlying asset not to recognize lease assets and lease liabilities. In transition, lessees and lessors are required to recognize and measure leases at the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach. This amendment will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The FASB issued ASU No. 2018-10 “Codification Improvements to Topic 842, Leases” and ASU No. 2018-11 “Leases (Topic 842) Targeted Improvements" in July 2018, and ASU No. 2018-20 "Leases (Topic 842) - Narrow Scope Improvements for Lessors" in December 2018. ASU 2018-10 and ASU 2018-20 provide certain amendments that affect narrow aspects of the guidance issued in ASU 2016-02. ASU 2018-11 allows all entities adopting ASU 2016-02 to choose an additional (and optional) transition method of adoption, under which an entity initially applies the new leases standard at the adoption date and recognizes a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings in the period of adoption. The Company expects to adopt ASU 2016-02 effective January 1, 2019, upon adoption of Topic 842, the Company expects recognition of additional assets and corresponding liabilities pertaining to its operating leases on its consolidated balance sheets. The Company does not expect the adoption of the new standard to have a significant impact on its consolidated statements of operations and cash flows.
 
In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework—Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement”. The amendments in this update is to improve the effectiveness of disclosures in the notes to the financial statements by facilitating clear communication of the information required by GAAP that is most important to users of each entity’s financial statements. The amendments in this Update apply to all entities that are required, under existing GAAP, to make disclosures about recurring or nonrecurring fair value measurements. The amendments in this update are effective for all entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company does not expect that this guidance will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
 
In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, “Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting”. The amendments in this update is to maintain or improve the usefulness of the information provided to the users of financial statements while reducing cost and complexity in financial reporting. The areas for simplification in this Update involve several aspects of the accounting for nonemployee share-based payment transactions resulting from expanding the scope of Topic 718, to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees. Some of the areas for simplification apply only to nonpublic entities. The amendments in this update are effective for all entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company does not expect that this guidance will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
 
In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, “Income Statement—Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income”. The amendments in this Update allow a reclassification from accumulated other comprehensive income to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Consequently, the amendments eliminate the stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and will improve the usefulness of information reported to financial statement users. However, because the amendments only relate to the reclassification of the income tax effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the underlying guidance that requires that the effect of a change in tax laws or rates be included in income from continuing operations is not affected. The amendments in this Update also require certain disclosures about stranded tax effects. The amendments in this update are effective for all entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company does not expect that this guidance will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
 
On December 22, 2017 the U.S. government enacted significant changes to federal tax law following the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“the Act”). Following the enactment of the Act, the SEC staff issued Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118, Income Tax Accounting Implications of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“SAB 118”). The Company follows the guidance in SAB 118, which provides additional clarification regarding the application of US GAAP in situations where the Company does not have the necessary information available, prepared, or analyzed in reasonable detail to complete the accounting for certain income tax effects of the Act for the reporting period in which the Act was enacted. SAB 118 provides for a measurement period beginning in the reporting period that includes the Act’s enactment date and ending when the Company has obtained, prepared, and analyzed the information needed in order to complete the accounting requirements but in no circumstances should the measurement period extend beyond one year from the enactment date. During the quarter ended December 31, 2018, the Company completed the accounting for the income tax effects of the Act, which resulted in an immaterial change in the net deferred tax asset, before valuation allowance, as of the enactment date. These impacts are disclosed in “Note 15 – Income Taxes” in the Notes accompanying the audited Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
In May 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-09, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718) Scope of Modification Accounting (“ASU 2017-09”). This ASU clarifies which changes to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award require an entity to apply modification accounting in Topic 718. The standard is effective for the Company on January 1, 2018, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted ASU 2017-09 during the year ended December 31, 2018,
and the adoption did not have a material impact on its financial statements.
 
In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-01 “Business Combinations (Topic 805): Clarifying the Definition of a Business”, which clarifies the definition of a business to assist entities with evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions or disposals of assets or businesses. The standard introduces a screen for determining when assets acquired are not a business and clarifies that a business must include, at a minimum, an input and a substantive process that contribute to an output to be considered a business. This standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within that reporting period. The Company adopted ASU 2017-01 during the year ended December 31, 2018, and the adoption did not have a material impact on its financial statements.
 
In December 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18 “Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash (a consensus of the FASB Emerging Issues Task Force,” which clarifies the presentation requirements of restricted cash within the statement of cash flows. The changes in restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents during the period should be included in the beginning and ending cash and cash equivalents balance reconciliation on the statement of cash flows. When cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents are presented in more than one line item within the statement of financial position, an entity shall calculate a total cash amount in a narrative or tabular format that agrees to the amount shown on the statement of cash flows. Details on the nature and amounts of restricted cash should also be disclosed. This standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within that reporting period. The Company adopted ASU 2016-18 during the year ended December 31,
2018
and the adoption did not have a material impact on its financial statements.
 
In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, “Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments.” ASU No. 2016-15 clarifies and provides specific guidance on eight cash flow classification issues that are not currently addressed by current GAAP and thereby reduce the current diversity in practice.  ASU No. 2016-15 is effective for public business entities for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2017, with early application permitted. This guidance is applicable to the Company’s fiscal year beginning January 1, 2018. The Company has adopted ASU 2016-15 during the year ended December 31, 2018, 
and the adoption did not have a material impact on its financial statements.
 
In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, “Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting” (“ASU 2016-09”). The standard is intended to simplify several areas of accounting for share-based compensation arrangements, including the income tax impact, classification on the statement of cash flows and forfeitures. ASU 2016-09 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2016, which for the Company will commence with the year beginning January 1, 2018, with early adoption permitted commencing January 1, 2017. The Company has adopted ASU 2016-09 during the year ended December 31, 2018,
and the adoption did not have a material impact on its financial statements.
 
In May 2014 the FASB issued Accounting Standards
Update (“ASU”) 
No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), 
in August 2015 the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, Deferral of the Effective Date, in March 2016 the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-08, Principal Versus Agent Considerations (Reporting Revenue Gross Versus Net), in April 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-10, Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing, 
in May 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-12, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)—Narrow Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients
, in December 2016 the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-20, Technical Corrections and Improvements to Update 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, in September 2017 the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-13 Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to the Staff Announcement at the July 20, 2017 EITF Meeting and Rescission of Prior SEC Staff Announcements and Observer Comments, and in November 2017 the FASB issued and made effective ASU 2017-14, Income Statement—Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220), Revenue Recognition (Topic 605), and Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606). 
These standards and their effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related disclosures are discussed below under Note 4, Revenue Recognition.