Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Revenue Recognition

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Revenue Recognition
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2018
Revenue from Contract with Customer [Abstract]  
Revenue from Contract with Customer [Text Block]
3.
Revenue Recognition
 
On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 606, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” (“ASC 606”). The core principle of ASC 606 requires that an entity recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. ASC 606 defines a five-step process to achieve this core principle and, in doing so, it is possible more judgment and estimates may be required within the revenue recognition process than required under existing accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) including identifying performance obligations in the contract, estimating the amount of variable consideration to include in the transaction price and allocating the transaction price to each separate performance obligation.
 
The Company adopted ASC 606 for all applicable contracts using the modified retrospective method, which would have required a cumulative-effect adjustment, if any, as of the date of adoption. The adoption of ASC 606 did not have a material impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements as of the date of adoption. As a result, a cumulative-effect adjustment was not required.
 
The Company recognizes revenue primarily from two different types of contracts, (i) product sales to customers and (ii) contract manufacturing. Revenue from sales of products as well as from contract manufacturing is recognized at the point where the customer obtains control of the goods and the Company satisfies its performance obligation, which generally is at the time it ships the product to the customer. To achieve this core principle, the Company applies the following five steps:
 
Step 1 – Identify the Contract with the Customer – A contract exists when (a) the parties to the contract have approved the contract and are committed to perform their respective obligations, (b) the entity can identify each party’s rights regarding the goods or services to be transferred, (c) the entity can identify the payment terms for the goods or services to be transferred, (d) the contract has commercial substance and it is probable that the entity will collect substantially all of the consideration to which it will be entitled in exchange for the goods or services that will be transferred to the customer.
 
Step 2 – Identify Performance Obligations in the Contract – Upon execution of a contract, the Company identifies as performance obligations each promise to transfer to the customer either (a) goods or services that are distinct or (b) a series of distinct goods or services that are substantially the same and have the same pattern of transfer to the customer. To the extent a contract includes multiple promised goods or services, the Company must apply judgement to determine whether the goods or services are capable of being distinct within the context of the contract. If these criteria are not met, the goods or services are accounted for as a combined performance obligation.
 
Step 3 – Determine the Transaction Price – The transaction price is determined based on the consideration to which the Company will be entitled in exchange for transferring products or services to the customer. Generally, all contracts include fixed consideration. If a contract did include variable consideration, the Company would determine the amount of variable consideration that should be included in the transaction price based on expected value method. Variable consideration would be included in the transaction price, if in the Company’s judgement, it is probable that a significant future reversal of cumulative revenue under the contract would not occur.
 
Step 4 – Allocate the Transaction Price – After the transaction price has been determined, the next step is to allocate the transaction price to each performance obligation in the contract. If the contract only has one performance obligation, the entire transaction price will be applied to that obligation. If the contract has multiple performance obligations, the transaction price is allocated to the performance obligations based on the relative standalone selling price (SSP) at contract inception.
 
Step 5 – Satisfaction of the Performance Obligations (and Recognize Revenue) – When an asset is transferred, and the customer obtains control of the asset (or the services are rendered), the Company recognizes revenue. At contract inception, the Company determines if each performance obligation is satisfied at a point in time or over time. Revenue from sales of products as well as from contract manufacturing is recognized at the point where the customer obtains control of the goods and the Company satisfies its performance obligation, which generally is at the time it ships the product to the customer.
 
Disaggregation of Revenue
 
The following table presents our disaggregated revenues by revenue source (in millions). The Company recognizes revenue primarily from two different types of contracts, (i) product sales to customers and (ii) contract manufacturing. Revenue from sales of products as well as from contract manufacturing is recognized at the point where the customer obtains control of the goods and the Company satisfies its performance obligation, which generally is at the time it ships the product to the customer.
 
 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
 
2018
 
2017
 
Product
 
$
4,841
 
$
3,896
 
Contract manufacturing
 
 
540
 
 
229
 
Total revenues, net
 
$
5,381
 
$
4,125
 
 
As of March 31, 2018, or December 31, 2017, the Company did not have any contract assets or contract liabilities from contracts with customers. During the three months ended March 31, 2018 and 2017, there was no revenue recognized from performance obligations satisfied (or partially satisfied) in previous periods. As of March 31, 2018, there were no remaining performance obligations that the Company had not satisfied.